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This lesson begins with students visiting a web site that gives them practice in counting money. The second site goes one step further in that students are given opportunities to make change for make-believe purchases.

KEY CONCEPTS

Characteristics of Money, Currency, Goods, Money Supply, Services

STUDENTS WILL

  • Review recognition of United States coins and bills.
  • Practice giving change.
  • Investigate the new design for quarters.

INTRODUCTION

This lesson begins with students visiting a web site that gives them practice in counting money. The second sitecoins goes one step further in that students are given opportunities to make change for make-believe purchases. Then students examine old and new quarters comparing and contrasting the designs. After a brief discussion of the United States government, mint, the third site shows close-ups of the newly designed quarters and provides more information about the United States mint and its work.

The student activities which close the less United States mint, or revisit money web sites for more practice.on allow boys and girls a chance to design a new quarter for their own state, to create a game using fun facts about the

RESOURCES


PROCESS

Activity 1

Discuss: Everyone is a consumer of goods and services and should be a wise user, a wise consumer. Such dimeconsumers manage their money efficiently. We all need to know how to recognize coins and bills, count them correctly, and make change accurately. Locate the A+ Math site where students can practice coin recognition and addition skills. Group your students appropriately in order to ensure success.

nickelActivity 2

The second site, FunBrain.com , uses up-to-date coins and bills for counting change for imaginary purchases. Three levels are available. Determine which level (easy, medium, or hard) should be assigned to members of your class.

Activity 3half dollar

Continue the lesson by looking at actual coins in the familiar style of quarters. Remind students that throughout history changes have been made in the money we use-changes in our change. Share the new quarters from Connecticut, Delaware, Georgia, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. Ask students if they can determine why THESE states had their quarters designed first.[achieved statehood first]

Ask/discuss:

1. Who makes our coins? [United States government]
2. Where are coins made? [mints]
3. Where are these mints found? [Headquarters in Washington, D.C.,
Philadelphia PA, Denver CO, San Francisco CA, West Point NY]
4. Sometimes coins are damaged and must be replaced. Such coins are sent to mints for "processing."
5. There are from 14-20 billion coins circulating every year.

quarterActivity 4

For a closer look at the new quarters, go to the 50 State Quarters Program . After comments from students about the new quarters, ask if they'd be interested in seeing when the quarter from your state was released. Check at 50 State Quarters Program Release Dates .

CONCLUSION

Next time you are counting money or making change, look for the new quarters.

EXTENSION ACTIVITY

1. Some students may wish to return to the A+ Math site for more practice.

2. Others may choose to go back to the Funbrain activity, giving change.

3. Trivia buffs might wish to check in with Fun Facts .  Perhaps a card or board game could be made using this information.

4. Distribute the prepared sheets with circles. Group or pair students for discussion about what they believe could be included on a design for your state. (If your quarter's design is finished, discuss a possible change or a second version.)

EDUCATOR REVIEWS

  • “This is an awesome lesson plan! It will be really helpful.”

    Esmie Sosa   POSTED ON October 21, 2004

  • “What a great lesson!”

    Kate, NY   POSTED ON December 15, 2006

  • “I really loved the funbrain site. Making change is something all kids need to know!!”

    Sue N., Wauwatosa, WI   POSTED ON February 2, 2011

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