One Country / Two Systems

EDUCATOR'S VERSION

This lesson printed from:
http://www.econedlink.org/e136

Posted December 28, 1998

Standard: 3

Grades: 9-12

Author: Council for Economic Education Technology Staff

Posted: December 28, 1998

Updated: March 28, 2014

DESCRIPTION

It has been one and a half years since British rule ended in Hong Kong and control of the city was returned to China. Under the Joint Declaration, Hong Kong is guaranteed a high degree of autonomy from China for fifty years as a Special Autonomous Region (SAR) of the People's Republic of China under the principles of "One Country/Two Systems" and "Hong Kong People Governing Hong Kong." In this lesson, you will visit web sites that will help you compare and evaluate the economic and political systems of China and Hong Kong.

KEY CONCEPTS

Economic Efficiency, Economic Equity, Economic Freedom, Economic Growth, Economic Security, Markets


INTRODUCTION

It has been one and a half years since  British rule ended in Hong Kong and control  of the city was returned to China. Under the  Joint Declaration, Hong Kong is guaranteed  a high degree of autonomy from China for  fifty years as a Special Autonomous Region  (SAR) of the People's Republic of China  under the principles of "One Country/Two  Systems" and "Hong Kong People  Governing Hong Kong." In this lesson, you  will visit web sites that will help you compare  and evaluate the economic and political  systems of China and Hong Kong.


PROCESS

flagIt has been one and a half years since British rule ended in Hong Kong and control of the city was returned to China. Under the Joint Declaration, Hong Kong is guaranteed a high degree of autonomy from China for fifty years as a Special Autonomous Region (SAR) of the People's Republic of China under the principles of "One Country/Two Systems" and "Hong Kong People Governing Hong Kong." In this lesson, you will visit web sites that will help you compare and evaluate the economic and political systems of China and Hong Kong.


The five broad goals described below can be thought of as criteria for evaluating an economic system. Some of these goals are difficult to measure in objective terms while others can be easily stated as numerical targets.


Visit the some of the sites below and take notes in order to establish a "grade" for China and Hong Kong as the city undergoes its 50-year transition to Chinese rule. Then, complete this worksheet.

*Adapted from Watts, Michael et al., "Focus: High School Economics." Copyright (c), Council for Economic Education: New York (pp.7-8)