Grade K-2
,
Lesson

Little Star’s Problem

Updated: March 19 2014,
Author: Mickey Ebert

Little Star has a problem, she wants a best friend. Learn how Dora and Boots help Little Star solve this problem and introduce the word "cost" in decision-making.

Introduction

Little Star shares a special wish with "Dora, the Explorer" and Boots in this computer read story. Little Star's wish is for a best friend, but when Dora and Boots try to solve her problem they find out that the other characters in the story have costs that prevent them from becoming Little Star's best friend. This lesson teaches what cost is and applies it to Little Star's problem.

Students' Version
star and moon
Little Star will share a special wish with "Dora, the Explorer," Boots, and you as you read a story. Little Star's wish is for a best friend, but when Dora and Boots try to solve her problem they find out that the other characters in the story have costs that prevent them from becoming Little Star's best friend.

Learning Objectives

  • Define cost as what you give up when you decide to do something.

Resource List

Process

Effective decision-making includes the ability to think through the costs and benefit of a decision. Being able to recognize costs of decisions is a skill that can be taught even to students at an early age. Lead the learners through these questions to establish the understanding of the word "cost."

Students' Version
Little Star's Wish Click on the star and then click on "Stories" and then click on "Dora the Explorer" and Little Star for Little Star's story. This will take you to a story read to you by the computer. This story can be read in English or Spanish.

Dora and Boots wanted to find a best friend for Little Star.


When you are finished reading the story, take the 'Little Star Quiz'.

View Interactive Activity

Conclusion

Students should understand that Isa and Mommy Bugga Bugga would love to be Little Star’s best friend, but the costs are too high. Watering the flowers in the morning and taking care of the babies are things that neither Isa nor Mommy Bugga Bugga is willing to give up.

Assessment

Decisions have costs to which students can relate. If they decide to wear a jacket instead of a coat, what might their cost be? [They might get cold.] If they decide not to carry an umbrella, what might their cost be? [They might get rained on.] If a student makes a decision to misbehave, what might his/her cost be? [Whatever the discipline plan of the classroom is.] Question the students to see if the students can relate what they give up every time there is a cost. When they don't wear a jacket, they give up being warm. When they decide not to carry an umbrella, they give up being dry.

Students' Version

Decisions have costs to which you can relate.

If you decide to wear a jacket instead of a coat, what might your cost be? freezing man

boy in the rain

If you decide not to carry an umbrella, what might your cost be?
If a student makes a decision to misbehave, what might his/her cost be? boy in timeout

sick in bed

If you decide not to wash your hands, what might your cost be?
If you decide to stay up late at night, what might your cost be? tired man

boy with broken leg

If you decide to run in the halls, what might your cost be?
If you decide to eat all the cake instead of a piece of cake, what might your cost be? tummy ache

 

Click here for extra stories, activities, and color pages featuring Dora and Little Star.

Students' Version
More Activities Click on the "More Activities" link for extra stories, activities, and color pages featuring Dora and Little Star:
Subjects:
Economics