We are Consumers and Producers

EDUCATOR'S VERSION

This lesson printed from:
http://www.econedlink.org/e457

Posted March 30, 2004

Standards: 7, 11

Grades: K-2

Author: Patricia Bonner

Posted: March 30, 2004

Updated: December 10, 2007

DESCRIPTION

Students are consumers and producers. So are their families. In this lesson students learn how they and family members fulfill these roles at home and in their community. They begin by exploring the goods and services that people use and they identify those that require the payment of money. To help show they can be producers, students sequence the steps in washing dishes. They discuss the fact that family members are often not paid for the work they do at home and as volunteers, taking account of the possibility that the benefits may outweigh the lack of pay. This lesson works well as a follow-up to Simple Simon Meets a Producer.

KEY CONCEPTS

Consumers, Goods, Producers, Services

STUDENTS WILL

  • Recognize the ways in which they and their families function as consumers and producers.
  • Identify goods and services that they must pay for.
  • Comprehend the importance of the work done by people at home and in the community.

INTRODUCTION

Hat ManAsk the students: Have you ever heard someone say he or she wears many hats? The hats represent the different roles or jobs that people have. People have many roles. At home one could be a husband or wife, parent, aunt or uncle, etc. The same person could also be a neighbor, instructor, and so on.

Ask students:

  • What hats do you wear at home? [Child, big brother or sister, grandchild, etc.]
  • What roles do you have at school and in our community? [Student, neighbor, scout, choir member, etc.]

Introduce the two main concepts: Did you know there are two more hats you wear? You are a consumer and a producer. A consumer is a person who buys and uses goods and services. A producer is a person who makes goods or provides services. [If you have not introduced these concepts previously, you will have to explain them.]

Tell the students that in this lesson they will learn more about how they and others are consumers and producers.

PROCESS

Activity 1:
Have students complete the Interactive Activity 1 to learn more about consumers. For students with limited reading skills, audio clips of the text are provided. If you prefer, you can project these activities via an LCD projector or TV monitor and read the text to the students.

Text and possible answers to the questions in the interactive activity listed above:

People who use goods and services are called consumers . You are a consumer. The people in your family are also consumers.

What are the consumers in the picture doing? [Eating pizza]

What goods and services do you use? [Food items, articles of clothing, books, school supplies, movies, bus rides, etc.]

People must pay money to buy some goods and services. At the end of this activity you will pick the goods and services that people must buy.  

What other goods and services do you buy with money?

Activity 2:
Have students complete the Interactive Activity 2 to learn more about producers. For students with limited reading skills, audio clips of the text are provided. If you prefer, you can project these activities via an LCD projector or TV monitor and read the text to the students.

Text and possible answers to the questions in the interactive activity listed above:

People who make goods and provide services are called producers . You are a producer. The people in your family are also producers.

What good or service are the producers in this picture providing for their family? [Moving boxes]

What goods and services do you provide your family? [Wash dishes, weed garden, sweep sidewalk, make bed, feed pet, do homework, etc.]

Activity 3:
Have students complete the printable activity I Can Wash Dishes and discuss the following questions with them.

THINK ABOUT IT

Lawn MowerSome children get paid for doing chores at home. Do you have any chores that you get paid to do? [Mowing the lawn, cleaning your room, doing the dishes, ect.]

Do your family members get paid for doing this work? [In most case no, but other children might receive an allowance or other pay for specific chores]

What other goods and services do you and your parents consume? [Cars, furniture, shoes, toys, etc.]

Who pays for the goods and services that you and your family use? [Students and their parents pay for the goods and services used. Students who have an understanding of public goods and services may also point out that the government collects taxes to pay for some goods and services used.]

The work that families do is very important. Why do you think this is so?

[Possible responses:

  • Some jobs such as meals and cleaning are essential to the operation of a home.
  • If a family member didn't do the work for free, the family might have to pay someone else to do it.
  • These jobs are a way to learn how to do something new.
  • It feels good to accomplish something and help the family.]

VaccumUse Your Producer Hands
Have your students or their families, do something to help their community. These sites will give you some ideas about they might do.

Kids Care Clubs

USA Points of Light Campaign

CONCLUSION

Hat ManSummarize the main points of the lesson:

  • When we wear our consumer hats, we buy and use goods and services. To get some of these goods and services, we must give money to producers in the marketplace.
  • We also wear producers hats. We provide goods and services to our families. Likewise, the other members of our families are also producers. Family members depend on each other for goods and services.

Ask the class to discuss the work that families do. Is the work done at home is important or not? What do they think would happen if people in the family chose not to do the work? Ask the students to identify what goods and services they and their families provide for the community.

ASSESSMENT ACTIVITY

Using the We are Consumers and Producers worksheet have students draw pictures of three goods and/or services they like to consume AND three goods and/or services they like to produce. Instruct those who can print to make lists rather than draw.

Teacher assessment of student responses during the follow-up discussions will also be used to evaluate student learning.

EXTENSION ACTIVITY

1. Ask each student to secretly write down the name of a good or service he or she uses. Then take turns having the other members of the class ask questions to determine what the listed goods and services are. For example:

  • Is it a good or service?
  • Who else uses your (good, service)?
  • Do you have to pay for it?
  • Is it bigger than your desk?
  • Can you (hear, taste, smell) it?
  • Is it a (durable, non durable) good?
  • Is it something we would find at (school, home}?

2. Create a bulletin board labeled We are Producers. Have students cut out or draw pictures of jobs they could do for their family and/or community.

3.Have students create gift coupons for services they will provide to members of their families.