Employment data for the month of September was finally released after being delayed for weeks by the shutdown. The numbers reflect a month of disappointing growth with little change in unemployment and fewer jobs created than expected. Economic correspondent Paul Solman looks at what it means for the nation's economic recovery.

This video is from the Making Sen$e with Paul Solman video series from PBS. Learn more about these videos and view a listing of the most recent videos we have available.

Key Concepts

Full Employment, Labor Force, Labor Market, Unemployment, Employment Rate

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