Related Lessons

Calendar Item: Razors And Batteries on September 13, 1996

Understanding and Analyzing an Income Statement

The income statement is one of the most important financial statements used in making business decisions. The income statement is an analytical tool that can be used in business and personal finance that summarizes business and personal transactions for a time period. Students must learn the components of an income statement and the ratios used to analyze a company's operations for a fiscal time period. This lesson will provide the tools for construction of an income statement for a service business and a merchandising business. In addition, students will be able to calculate the component percentage that each revenue, expense, and net profit. One of the main goals of this rigorous examination of the income statement is to prepare students for an accounting or personal finance class.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 12/01/2014

Deriving Marginalism

This lesson creates a connection between derivatives and marginalism. Students will be engaging in a set of scaffolding activities that explore the Marginal Cost function, Marginal Revenue function, and the implications that these functions have on production. A short video clip will provide example of why the intersection of Marginal Cost and Marginal Revenue yields maximum profit.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 02/12/2015

Business Ownership: How Sweet It Can Be!

In this lesson, students research the three basic types of business organization: sole proprietorships, partnerships, and corporations. Considering the advantages and disadvantages of each, they function as consultants offering advice on which form of business is best suited for different business scenarios. The case studies all feature real- life entrepreneurs who started businesses producing chocolate candy and cookies—they all result ultimately in “sweet” success stories. Once students have made their recommendations, they are provided the identities of their clients and asked to prepare reports that tell the rest of the story—what happened to each founder and business. Products featured in this lesson that almost every student will recognize are the Hershey chocolate bar, Mars M&Ms and Famous Amos chocolate cookies.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 04/20/2004

Related Publications

The following lessons come from the Council for Economic Education's library of publications. Clicking the publication title or image will take you to the Council for Economic Education Store for more detailed information.

Advanced Placement Economics: Teacher Resource Manual

The teacher guide accompanies the student activities books in macro- and microeconomics for teaching college-level economics in AP Economics courses. The publication contains course outlines, unit plans, teaching instructions, and answers to the student activities and sample tests.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 2003

58 out of 58 lessons from this publication relate to this EconEdLink lesson.

Capstone: Exemplary Lessons for High School Economics - Teacher's Guide

This publication contains complete instructions for teaching the lessons in Capstone. When combined with a textbook, Capstone provides activities for a complete high school economics course. 45 exemplary lessons help students learn to apply economic reasoning to a wide range of real-world subjects.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 2003

45 out of 45 lessons from this publication relate to this EconEdLink lesson.

Focus: Understanding Economics in U.S. History

Focus: Understanding Economics in U.S. History uses a unique mystery-solving approach to teach U.S. economic history to your high school students.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 2006

40 out of 40 lessons from this publication relate to this EconEdLink lesson.