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Calendar Item: Boss Tweed Exposed on July 8, 1871


Public Choice Economics

Students participate in a series of classroom elections to analyze special-interest effects and see how the costs of voting and acquiring information about candidates or propositions on a ballot affect whether or not people vote, and, if they do, how informed they will be. Students examine the causes and consequences of logrolling and other collusion by elected officials. Finally, students determine whether Indianapolis’s Lucas Oil Stadium is an example of public choice theory in action. COMPELLING QUESTION Does voting always result in the best choice?

Grades: 9-12
Published: 04/26/2016

Opportunity Cost

Consumers are faced with tough choices because so many innovative and exciting products and services are available. Therefore, engraining a decision-making process that includes considering of opportunity cost is necessary to shape future consumer behavior.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 01/03/2012

Social Security, Governance, and the National Debt

ESSENTIAL DILEMMA What responsibility does the federal government have to ensure the elderly a secure and stable standard of living?

Grades: 9-12
Published: 04/07/2016

Related Publications

The following lessons come from the Council for Economic Education's library of publications. Clicking the publication title or image will take you to the Council for Economic Education Store for more detailed information.


Advanced Placement Economics: Teacher Resource Manual

The teacher guide accompanies the student activities books in macro- and microeconomics for teaching college-level economics in AP Economics courses. The publication contains course outlines, unit plans, teaching instructions, and answers to the student activities and sample tests.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 2003

58 out of 58 lessons from this publication relate to this EconEdLink lesson.

Capstone: Exemplary Lessons for High School Economics - Teacher's Guide

This publication contains complete instructions for teaching the lessons in Capstone. When combined with a textbook, Capstone provides activities for a complete high school economics course. 45 exemplary lessons help students learn to apply economic reasoning to a wide range of real-world subjects.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 2003

45 out of 45 lessons from this publication relate to this EconEdLink lesson.

Focus: Understanding Economics in U.S. History

Focus: Understanding Economics in U.S. History uses a unique mystery-solving approach to teach U.S. economic history to your high school students.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 2006

40 out of 40 lessons from this publication relate to this EconEdLink lesson.