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Calendar Item: Disney Enters The Internet on June 18, 1998


Market-Ability

Marketplace, a daily economics news program heard on National Public Radio, featured a story on January 8, 2002, titled "Microsoft Invades the Kitchen." In this segment, reporter Aaron Schachter describes consumers' enthusiasm, or lack thereof, for two new Microsoft products and explores the concept that the process of innovation and consumer response has in ongoing market development.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 07/31/2002

Here's Your Chance to Make Millions in the Stock Market (Part 2)

In Part II of this lesson, students will have the opportunity to complete an interactive exercise that will take them on a historical tour of the stock market from 1920 until just after WWII. Students will learn the difference between a buy and hold vs market timing strategy as it relates to investing. Part III continues this interactive exercise by taking the student on a historical stock journey beginning slightly after WWII and proceeding through end of year 2000.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 11/08/2002

Is the Price of Gasoline Really Too High?

This lesson is designed to help students explore the issues associated with gasoline prices. The notion that a price is "too high" implies that consumers are being somehow unfairly treated or abused by overzealous corporations. In a market system, producers must compete for consumer dollars, with price determined by the interaction of supply and demand. Under competitive circumstances, we do not consider a price to be too high or somehow unfair; we accept the actions of buyers and sellers as the most efficient method for allocating resources. In other words, if some people want to pay $75 for a ticket to Bruce Springsteen concert, that is their choice. If, however, the market is less than competitive and firms are not competing in a legal way for consumer dollars, we have a situation were prices may actually be "too high." The questions to be addressed in this lesson involve the forces driving the price of gasoline and whether or not the market is competitive. If the market is competitive then the high prices we are experiencing are appropriate given the current levels of supply and demand. If, on the other hand, the market for gasoline is not competitive and firms are artificially manipulating prices, then the current high price may require government action.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 06/28/2000

Related Publications

The following lessons come from the Council for Economic Education's library of publications. Clicking the publication title or image will take you to the Council for Economic Education Store for more detailed information.


Advanced Placement Economics: Teacher Resource Manual

The teacher guide accompanies the student activities books in macro- and microeconomics for teaching college-level economics in AP Economics courses. The publication contains course outlines, unit plans, teaching instructions, and answers to the student activities and sample tests.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 2003

58 out of 58 lessons from this publication relate to this EconEdLink lesson.

Capstone: Exemplary Lessons for High School Economics - Teacher's Guide

This publication contains complete instructions for teaching the lessons in Capstone. When combined with a textbook, Capstone provides activities for a complete high school economics course. 45 exemplary lessons help students learn to apply economic reasoning to a wide range of real-world subjects.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 2003

45 out of 45 lessons from this publication relate to this EconEdLink lesson.

Focus: Understanding Economics in U.S. History

Focus: Understanding Economics in U.S. History uses a unique mystery-solving approach to teach U.S. economic history to your high school students.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 2006

40 out of 40 lessons from this publication relate to this EconEdLink lesson.