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Related Lessons

Calendar Item: Woodin Named Fifty-First Treasury Secretary on May 5, 1933


Where did All the Money Go? The Great Depression Mystery

In this lesson, the students read a brief passage that poses the mystery, "How did the Great Depression happen?" As detectives, they gather clues using the Internet to investigate the mystery through a series of clue sheets. In the first step they complete a retrieval chart to summarize information about the consumer price index, unemployment rate, federal spending, and US and world events that have economic and political implications. Next, working in groups, they then do additional research on the Internet focusing on information on the economic conditions of the country looking at labor, income, unemployment, government spending, and the public debt. Then you will read three articles on some of the top economic events of the century, including Henry Ford 's impact, the Federal Reserve System's role in the economy, and the stock market crash of 1929. Finally, they complete an interactive web model that demonstrates the interdependence of a market system.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 04/27/2004

The Family Vacation

Students will take a surprise trip around the world. As they travel, they will use clues to discover where they are going. They will then figure out how much money they have spent in U.S. dollars, using exchange rates.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 08/03/2009

'Be All You Can Be'...For Minimum Wage?

Perhaps you have seen the catchy TV ads for the various branches of the United States military. You know, the ones that tell you to "be all you can be...in the Army!." In the last decade, these advertisements have become necessary because compulsory military service (otherwise known as "the draft") no longer exists in the United States. Compulsory service, long required during time of war, was reinstituted in the United States in 1940, as the United States was on the brink of World War II. The draft remained in effect through the turbulent 1960s but was suspended by President Nixon in 1973. In the late 1970s, Congress passed legislation officially halting the draft.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 03/23/2000

Related Publications

The following lessons come from the Council for Economic Education's library of publications. Clicking the publication title or image will take you to the Council for Economic Education Store for more detailed information.


Focus: Understanding Economics in U.S. History

Focus: Understanding Economics in U.S. History uses a unique mystery-solving approach to teach U.S. economic history to your high school students.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 2006

13 out of 40 lessons from this publication relate to this EconEdLink lesson.

Capstone: Exemplary Lessons for High School Economics - Teacher's Guide

This publication contains complete instructions for teaching the lessons in Capstone. When combined with a textbook, Capstone provides activities for a complete high school economics course. 45 exemplary lessons help students learn to apply economic reasoning to a wide range of real-world subjects.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 2003

9 out of 45 lessons from this publication relate to this EconEdLink lesson.

Focus: High School Economics

This revised edition features simulations, role plays, small-group discussions and other active-learning instructional activities to help students explore economic concepts through real-life applications.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 2001

9 out of 21 lessons from this publication relate to this EconEdLink lesson.