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Related Lessons

Calendar Item: The Origins Of Trust Busting on May 14, 1884


What Happened to Railroads?

Between the Civil War and World War II, railroads were one of the nation's most important businesses and an integral part of people’s lives. In this lesson, students assume the role of detectives investigating why the rail companies experienced a crisis in the 1960s and what helped the freight transport portion of the business return to profitability later in the same century. Students analyze a set of clues that help them explore the impact of government policies and changes in consumer demand on rail service. They discover that government policies (e.g., regulations, subsidies, and taxes) can have both positive and negative consequences in the marketplace. An interactive activity helps students understand that rail service competes in two different markets—passenger service and hauling freight. Students also learn that railroads and government policies have had to adjust as the transportation industry changed in the second half of the twentieth century.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 06/07/2007

New Sense, Inc. vs. Fish 'Till U Drop or Coase Vs. Pigou

Hot debate and arguments galore whirl around this question: "Which economic approach is the most efficient and fair to resolve utility issues surrounding the use of common or public property?" This lesson will explore, examine and analyze this perplexing question by engaging in an open-ended role play simulation.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 08/05/2005

Chevy Volt...It’s Electric!

The costs and benefits of owning an electric or hybrid car will be evaluated in this lesson. By reading and researching the history of the production of electric cars, the lesson allows students to understand how this market has developed. Specifically, the evaluation will focus on the Chevy Volt and its attempt to compete in a constantly evolving market of automobiles. Through this lesson, students will attempt to decide whether the Volt can be competitive in price and range, as well as what incentives need to be provided to make it a more appealing purchase to consumers. There have also been several changes made to the aerodynamics of the prototype of the Volt to the first model released to consumers in order to make the battery more efficient. Finally, students will look at the supply and demand, and production of the Chevy Volt.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 12/20/2011

Related Publications

The following lessons come from the Council for Economic Education's library of publications. Clicking the publication title or image will take you to the Council for Economic Education Store for more detailed information.


Capstone: Exemplary Lessons for High School Economics - Teacher's Guide

This publication contains complete instructions for teaching the lessons in Capstone. When combined with a textbook, Capstone provides activities for a complete high school economics course. 45 exemplary lessons help students learn to apply economic reasoning to a wide range of real-world subjects.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 2003

14 out of 45 lessons from this publication relate to this EconEdLink lesson.

Financial Fitness for Life: 9-12 - Teacher Guide

This publication contains lessons for teaching personal finance concepts to 9-12 students. Lessons for older students illustrate certain uses of more abstract representations.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 2010

8 out of 24 lessons from this publication relate to this EconEdLink lesson.

Mathematics & Economics: Connections for Life - 9-12

Created specifically for high school mathematics teachers, this publication shows how mathematics concepts and knowledge can be used to develop economic and personal financial understandings.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 2001

8 out of 15 lessons from this publication relate to this EconEdLink lesson.