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Calendar Item: New Coke Introduced on April 23, 1985


Baseball Economics 201

As many baseball fans can tell you, the New York Yankees usually have a great season record, make the playoffs and make a run towards to the World Championship each year. The Yankees' success--as well as the success of other big market, high revenue teams--has led many to question whether smaller market teams can compete in Major League Baseball (MLB). In fact, in 2009, the Yankees had revenues of $441 million, the most of any team in sports--and more than the revenue of four other MLB teams (Florida, San Diego, Pittsburgh, and Washington) combined! Many baseball writers (who may or may not know very much about economics) have written that our national pastime may be threatened by the big market, high revenue teams like the Yankees (or the New York Mets, Chicago Cubs, Boston Red Sox, etc.) and that smaller market teams (e.g., the Florida Marlins, San Diego Padres or the Pittsburgh Pirates) cannot compete for the high salaried free agents (e.g., Alex Rodriguez, Manny Ramirez) necessary to win championships. In fact, some writers claim that many MLB teams are actually not profitable for the team owners. Are these claims true? Are MLB teams losing money? Are MLB owners looking to dump unprofitable teams on unsuspecting investors? Are MLB players grossly overpaid? This lesson will help your students answer these and other questions.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 05/27/2011

Would You Demand It?

How many students would demand a cell phone that costs $3,995? That was the price of the first cell phone available to the public, the DynaTAC8000X, in 1983. By 2011, the average price of a smartphone was $135, and more people were buying cell phones. In this lesson, students will learn about demand and its determinants by examining the Internet subscription, food, and car industries.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 08/14/2014

The Economics of Recycling

Students will review the legislation in Japan that requires all consumers to pay a fee for recycling large appliances.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 02/15/2002

Related Publications

The following lessons come from the Council for Economic Education's library of publications. Clicking the publication title or image will take you to the Council for Economic Education Store for more detailed information.


Capstone: Exemplary Lessons for High School Economics - Teacher's Guide

This publication contains complete instructions for teaching the lessons in Capstone. When combined with a textbook, Capstone provides activities for a complete high school economics course. 45 exemplary lessons help students learn to apply economic reasoning to a wide range of real-world subjects.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 2003

15 out of 45 lessons from this publication relate to this EconEdLink lesson.

Mathematics & Economics: Connections for Life - 9-12

Created specifically for high school mathematics teachers, this publication shows how mathematics concepts and knowledge can be used to develop economic and personal financial understandings.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 2001

11 out of 15 lessons from this publication relate to this EconEdLink lesson.

Focus: Understanding Economics in U.S. History

Focus: Understanding Economics in U.S. History uses a unique mystery-solving approach to teach U.S. economic history to your high school students.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 2006

10 out of 40 lessons from this publication relate to this EconEdLink lesson.