EconEdLink

Related Lessons

Calendar Item: The Mint Is Created on April 2, 1792


Where did All the Money Go? The Great Depression Mystery

In this lesson, the students read a brief passage that poses the mystery, "How did the Great Depression happen?" As detectives, they gather clues using the Internet to investigate the mystery through a series of clue sheets. In the first step they complete a retrieval chart to summarize information about the consumer price index, unemployment rate, federal spending, and US and world events that have economic and political implications. Next, working in groups, they then do additional research on the Internet focusing on information on the economic conditions of the country looking at labor, income, unemployment, government spending, and the public debt. Then you will read three articles on some of the top economic events of the century, including Henry Ford 's impact, the Federal Reserve System's role in the economy, and the stock market crash of 1929. Finally, they complete an interactive web model that demonstrates the interdependence of a market system.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 04/27/2004

Transportation: They Say We Had a Revolution (Part 2)

Advancements in transportation have played a key role in the growth of our nation. U.S.government policies have also had a considerable impact on the development of transport as we know it today. In this series of three lessons, the students examine the advancements in automobiles, roads, airlines and airports.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 06/03/2009

The South's Decision to Secede: A Violation of Self Interest?

Essential Dilemma Your students will consider the following questions: In deciding to secede from the Union in 1861, did the South violate its own self-interest and thus disprove the basic economic principle that people seek to further their self-interest in the decisions they make? To get at the question, each student will assume the role of an ardent secessionist. Acting in this role, the students will apply principles of economic reasoning and use a decision grid to weigh the benefits and costs of the South's effort to create a new nation in which slavery and state's rights would forever be guaranteed by law.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 04/08/2005

Related Publications

The following lessons come from the Council for Economic Education's library of publications. Clicking the publication title or image will take you to the Council for Economic Education Store for more detailed information.


Focus: Understanding Economics in Civics and Government

This publication contains 20 lessons designed to provide an economic insight into topics typically covered in may civics and government classes.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 2009

12 out of 21 lessons from this publication relate to this EconEdLink lesson.

Focus: Understanding Economics in U.S. History

Focus: Understanding Economics in U.S. History uses a unique mystery-solving approach to teach U.S. economic history to your high school students.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 2006

11 out of 40 lessons from this publication relate to this EconEdLink lesson.

Energy, Economics, and the Environment: Case Studies and Teaching Activities for High School

This publication helps students analyze energy and environment issues from an economics perspective.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 2006

6 out of 10 lessons from this publication relate to this EconEdLink lesson.