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Calendar Item: Van Buren Enacts The 10-Hour Workday on March 31, 1840


Broad Social Goals of an Economy

COMPELLING QUESTION Why do politicians disagree on economic issues—isn’t there one right answer? Students work in small groups and are assigned a version of diary excerpts written by a student intern working for a policymaking legislator. Half the groups read a diary that focuses on stability, security, and equity as broad social goals. The other half read a diary that focuses on freedom, efficiency, and growth. Students determine which broad social goals are emphasized in their reading.  During a debriefing, students will discuss broad social goals and identify how trade-offs arise when a society pursues competing social goals. Finally, students choose a current social issue and develop a public policy to deal with that issue, identifying the goals they are attempting to achieve and trade-offs that might arise in terms of other worthy goals.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 05/09/2016

The Costs of Credit

"Will that be cash, check, debit, or credit?" This lesson plan explores the difference between these. What is the difference? Is using credit the same as paying with cash? Or by check? Or by debit card? Some young people believe that using credit is the same as paying with cash. In fact, some young people believe that all you need to make purchases is a credit card. It seems as if a credit card can pay for anything-and everything. But how you pay for things does make a difference. In this lesson, you will learn how using credit differs from paying in cash, by check, or by debit card. You will learn why credit has costs, and what the influences are that affect the cost of credit.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 10/30/2000

Focus on Economic Data: The Federal Reserve and Monetary Policy, October 29, 2014

This lesson utilizes the October 29, 2014, statement of the Federal Reserve's Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) to explore the Federal Reserve's twin goals of price stability and full employment. This lesson discusses the recent announcement of the end of the QE3 bond buy-back and the rationale and implications of this decision.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 11/19/2014

Related Publications

The following lessons come from the Council for Economic Education's library of publications. Clicking the publication title or image will take you to the Council for Economic Education Store for more detailed information.


Focus: Understanding Economics in U.S. History

Focus: Understanding Economics in U.S. History uses a unique mystery-solving approach to teach U.S. economic history to your high school students.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 2006

6 out of 40 lessons from this publication relate to this EconEdLink lesson.

Risky Business DVD

Use this DVD program to show students how to live healthy, wealthy and risk-free.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 2007

3 out of 12 lessons from this publication relate to this EconEdLink lesson.

Capstone: Exemplary Lessons for High School Economics - Teacher's Guide

This publication contains complete instructions for teaching the lessons in Capstone. When combined with a textbook, Capstone provides activities for a complete high school economics course. 45 exemplary lessons help students learn to apply economic reasoning to a wide range of real-world subjects.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 2003

3 out of 45 lessons from this publication relate to this EconEdLink lesson.