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Calendar Item: Green Light For Tax Relief on October 23, 1975


Money is What Money Does

Throughout history, a wide variety of items have served as money. These include gold, silver, large stone wheels, tobacco, beer, dog teeth, porpoise teeth, cattle, metal coins, paper bills, and checks. All of these types of money should be judged on how well they accomplish the functions of money. Money is what money does. To be a good medium of exchange, money must be accepted by people when buying and selling their productive resources and when buying and selling goods and services. It should be portable or easily carried from place to place. It also must be divisible so that large and small transactions can be made. To be a good store of value, money must be durable so it can be kept for future use. It also should have a stable value so people do not lose purchasing power if they use the money at a later time. To be a good standard of value or unit of account, money must be useful for quoting prices. To accomplish this, money must be familiar, divisible, and acceptable.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 02/12/1999

What's the Cost of Spending and Saving?

This lesson examines the benefits and opportunity cost of spending and saving. The students learn how compound interest makes savings grow. Compounding provides an incentive to save and invest early. The benefits of saving and investing when you are young can increase substantially over time when funds are allowed to compound.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 12/01/2010

The Costs of Credit

"Will that be cash, check, debit, or credit?" This lesson plan explores the difference between these. What is the difference? Is using credit the same as paying with cash? Or by check? Or by debit card? Some young people believe that using credit is the same as paying with cash. In fact, some young people believe that all you need to make purchases is a credit card. It seems as if a credit card can pay for anything-and everything. But how you pay for things does make a difference. In this lesson, you will learn how using credit differs from paying in cash, by check, or by debit card. You will learn why credit has costs, and what the influences are that affect the cost of credit.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 10/30/2000

Related Publications

The following lessons come from the Council for Economic Education's library of publications. Clicking the publication title or image will take you to the Council for Economic Education Store for more detailed information.


Risky Business DVD

Use this DVD program to show students how to live healthy, wealthy and risk-free.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 2007

3 out of 12 lessons from this publication relate to this EconEdLink lesson.

Economics in Action: 14 Greatest Hits for Teaching High School Economics

Economics in Action combines 14 favorite CEE simulations, role-playing activities, group activities and classroom demonstrations in one volume.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 2003

2 out of 14 lessons from this publication relate to this EconEdLink lesson.

Focus: Understanding Economics in U.S. History

Focus: Understanding Economics in U.S. History uses a unique mystery-solving approach to teach U.S. economic history to your high school students.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 2006

2 out of 40 lessons from this publication relate to this EconEdLink lesson.