EconEdLink

Related Lessons

Lesson: Babysitter Shortage in Washington, D.C.


What Do People Want to Wear?

To stay in business, fashion merchandisers must be able to anticipate what consumers want. By looking at different retail websites, students will look to anticipate what consumers are demanding. Students will then go through the market scenarios for each product and try to anticipate the effect the scenario will have on the demand and price (assuming constant supply) for the product they have chosen.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 07/22/2003

Marketplace: Oil Is a Slippery Business

OPEC is generally seen as the primary institution that controls oil prices. Is that what OPEC really does? Use this lesson to get an overview of the history and function of this institution.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 05/22/2002

Collecting for Fun . . . and Profit?

Art, baseball cards, coins, comic books, dolls, jewelry and stamps are just a few examples of the many things people collect. While some people collect for fun — others hope to profit. In this lesson, students explore how supply and demand influence the price of collectibles. They also evaluate speculation in collectibles as an investment option. They learn that collectibles are one of the riskiest ways people can invest their money.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 12/27/2004

Related Publications

The following lessons come from the Council for Economic Education's library of publications. Clicking the publication title or image will take you to the Council for Economic Education Store for more detailed information.


Learning, Earning and Investing: High School

This publication contains 23 lessons that introduce high school students to the world of investing--its benefits and risks and the critical role it plays in fostering capital formation and job creation in our free market system.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 2004

5 out of 23 lessons from this publication relate to this EconEdLink lesson.

Focus: Understanding Economics in U.S. History

Focus: Understanding Economics in U.S. History uses a unique mystery-solving approach to teach U.S. economic history to your high school students.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 2006

2 out of 40 lessons from this publication relate to this EconEdLink lesson.