Related Lessons

Lesson: Where did All the Money Go? The Great Depression Mystery

Focus on Economic Data: Consumer Price Index and Inflation: August 2014

Using data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics on the Consumer Price Index (CPI), students investigate the latest release for August 2014. Students analyze the components of the inflation rate measure, explore the issues with respect to the methodology, and develop an understanding of the impact of inflation on different groups of people.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 11/14/2014

Focus on Economic Data: Consumer Price Index and Inflation, January 8, 2015

Using data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics for the Consumer Price Index (CPI), students explore the latest release for November 2014. They analyze the shortcomings of the measurement of the CPI and the implications of these problems.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 01/29/2015

The Economics of the New Deal

The stock-market crash of 1929 is generally seen as the start of The Great Depression, the worst economic downturn in the history of the United States. The Depression had devastating effects on the country. But it also served as a wake-up call for economic reform. Until the Great Depression, the U.S. government had made very few modifications to the nation's economic policies. It left the dealings of the economy and businesses to their own devices. But once the Great Depression began the nation needed help, FAST! The stock market was in shambles. Many banks closed. Farmers fell into bankruptcy and were forced off their land. Twenty-five percent of the work force, or 13 million people, were unemployed in 1932. In 1933, the Roosevelt Administration addressed the problem by making the government a key player in the nation’s economy. Using his New Deal as a force for reform, President Roosevelt created policies, agencies and standards to help alleviate serious problems. The reforms provided America with an economy that has been relatively stable for almost 80 years. Students will be prompted to think about the different programs and policies the New Deal created and how they are relevant to the role of government, and fiscal, and monetary policy, both then and now.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 06/20/2005

Related Publications

The following lessons come from the Council for Economic Education's library of publications. Clicking the publication title or image will take you to the Council for Economic Education Store for more detailed information.

Teaching Financial Crises

Teaching Financial Crises is an eight lesson resource that provides an organizing framework in which to contextualize all of the media attention that has been paid to the recent financial crisis, as well as put it in a historical context. The current events stories, opinion pieces, and other popular media pieces that are today in great supply have generally not connected to educational objectives, historical analysis, and economic processes and concepts that are used in the high school classroom. In Teaching Financial Crises, teachers will find a non-partisan and non-ideological resource to help them simplify and offer balanced perspectives on this challenging subject matter.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 2010

2 out of 9 lessons from this publication relate to this EconEdLink lesson.

Economics in Action: 14 Greatest Hits for Teaching High School Economics

Economics in Action combines 14 favorite CEE simulations, role-playing activities, group activities and classroom demonstrations in one volume.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 2003

1 out of 14 lessons from this publication relate to this EconEdLink lesson.

Trading Around the World

Created as a supplement to existing middle school world geography and world history courses, the 5 units in this guide introduce students to the basics of global trade.

Grades: 6-9
Published: 2007

1 out of 7 lessons from this publication relate to this EconEdLink lesson.