EconEdLink

Related Lessons

Lesson: Price Elasticity: From Tires to Toothpicks


Here's Your Chance to Make Millions in the Stock Market (Part 2)

In Part II of this lesson, students will have the opportunity to complete an interactive exercise that will take them on a historical tour of the stock market from 1920 until just after WWII. Students will learn the difference between a buy and hold vs market timing strategy as it relates to investing. Part III continues this interactive exercise by taking the student on a historical stock journey beginning slightly after WWII and proceeding through end of year 2000.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 11/08/2002

Is the Price of Gasoline Really Too High?

This lesson is designed to help students explore the issues associated with gasoline prices. The notion that a price is "too high" implies that consumers are being somehow unfairly treated or abused by overzealous corporations. In a market system, producers must compete for consumer dollars, with price determined by the interaction of supply and demand. Under competitive circumstances, we do not consider a price to be too high or somehow unfair; we accept the actions of buyers and sellers as the most efficient method for allocating resources. In other words, if some people want to pay $75 for a ticket to Bruce Springsteen concert, that is their choice. If, however, the market is less than competitive and firms are not competing in a legal way for consumer dollars, we have a situation were prices may actually be "too high." The questions to be addressed in this lesson involve the forces driving the price of gasoline and whether or not the market is competitive. If the market is competitive then the high prices we are experiencing are appropriate given the current levels of supply and demand. If, on the other hand, the market for gasoline is not competitive and firms are artificially manipulating prices, then the current high price may require government action.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 06/28/2000

Collecting for Fun . . . and Profit?

Art, baseball cards, coins, comic books, dolls, jewelry and stamps are just a few examples of the many things people collect. While some people collect for fun — others hope to profit. In this lesson, students explore how supply and demand influence the price of collectibles. They also evaluate speculation in collectibles as an investment option. They learn that collectibles are one of the riskiest ways people can invest their money.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 12/27/2004

Related Publications

The following lessons come from the Council for Economic Education's library of publications. Clicking the publication title or image will take you to the Council for Economic Education Store for more detailed information.


Capstone: Exemplary Lessons for High School Economics - Teacher's Guide

This publication contains complete instructions for teaching the lessons in Capstone. When combined with a textbook, Capstone provides activities for a complete high school economics course. 45 exemplary lessons help students learn to apply economic reasoning to a wide range of real-world subjects.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 2003

9 out of 45 lessons from this publication relate to this EconEdLink lesson.

Mathematics & Economics: Connections for Life - 9-12

Created specifically for high school mathematics teachers, this publication shows how mathematics concepts and knowledge can be used to develop economic and personal financial understandings.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 2001

7 out of 15 lessons from this publication relate to this EconEdLink lesson.

Learning, Earning and Investing: High School

This publication contains 23 lessons that introduce high school students to the world of investing--its benefits and risks and the critical role it plays in fostering capital formation and job creation in our free market system.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 2004

5 out of 23 lessons from this publication relate to this EconEdLink lesson.