EconEdLink

Related Lessons

Lesson: What's Your Angle?


I Can Be an Entrepreneur

Learners are given advice on how they can earn extra money by becoming an entrepreneur. After investigating several web pages that offer examples of what other people their age have done to earn money, students identify three money-making ideas for themselves such as: considering what they would enjoy doing, what they do well, what people are willing to buy, the need to set a price that will be profitable, and safety. In a follow-up activity, students are given tips on how they might advertise what they are selling. They prepare flyers to promote one of their ideas for earning money. For an introduction to earning and other ways people get money, the instructor may want to first use the lesson 'Money Doesn’t Grow on Trees.'  

Grades: 6-8
Published: 10/30/2003

Believe it or Not?

Advertisements can tell consumers about prices and other information that may help them in the decisions they make about what to buy. But students also should know that ads are slanted by sellers to show a product in the best light. This lesson reveals to students how advertisers use words and images to make goods and services look their best. To protect consumers and make sure that competition among sellers is fair in the marketplace, the federal government requires that factual claims in ads be backed up with proof. Still, it is usually okay for sellers to talk only about the positives and ignore the negatives of what they are selling. Another common trick is to use exaggerated claims called “puffery.” It is up to the consumers to separate factual claims from opinions and exaggerations. This lesson challenges students to create a set of tips that could help consumers to make this distinction. Being able to tell the difference between factual claims and puffery or opinions can help consumers to make smart choices and avoid market disappointments.

Grades: 6-8
Published: 03/03/2006

Did You Get the Message?

Advertising is the primary tool used by businesses to tell consumers about the goods and services they sell in the marketplace. Businesses also use advertising to try to convince consumers to buy what they are selling. Advertisements do this by pointing out how consumers will benefit if they buy a product. These benefits are called incentives. In this lesson, these two basic functions of advertising are introduced. Various techniques used to achieve these objectives are also explained. During the assessment activity, students view television commercials directed at them. They identify the various advertising techniques used to grab their attention and convince them to buy.

Grades: 6-8
Published: 06/15/2006

Related Publications

The following lessons come from the Council for Economic Education's library of publications. Clicking the publication title or image will take you to the Council for Economic Education Store for more detailed information.


Energy, Economics, and the Environment: Case Studies and Teaching Activities for Elementary School

This publication helps elementary students analyze energy and environment issues from an economics perspective.

Grades: 3-6
Published: 2006

2 out of 10 lessons from this publication relate to this EconEdLink lesson.

Playful Economics

Designed primarily for elementary and middle school students, each of the 15 lessons in this guide introduces an economics concept through activities with modeling clay.

Grades: K-8
Published: 2011

1 out of 17 lessons from this publication relate to this EconEdLink lesson.

Focus: Economics - Grades 3-5

This publication contains fourteen lessons that use a unique blend of games, simulations, and role playing to illustrate economics in a way elementary students will enjoy.

Grades: 3-5
Published: 2005

1 out of 16 lessons from this publication relate to this EconEdLink lesson.