EconEdLink

Related Lessons

Lesson: What Does A Dollar Really Buy?


The Wizard of Oz Visits Japan

Deflationary conditions in the United States have not returned since the Great Depression. Instead, U.S. policymakers have frequently found it necessary to battle inflation over the past sixty years. While not a problem in America, concerns have been recently voiced about the economic effects of deflation in Japan. This EconomicsMinute examines (approximately one century after the publication of "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz") the extent to which the deflationary "wizard" can be expected to influence economic prosperity in Japan at the dawn of the twenty-first century.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 10/18/1999

How Much Does it Cost Now?

Students will use the FRED database to download the Consumer Price Index (CPI) and calculate the equivalent price of a product from an earlier time to the relative price today. Students will discuss the limits of using a weighted index and changes in the quality of products when calculating the relative prices of goods from two time periods.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 06/03/2010

The Road to Emerald City Is Paved with Good Intentions

'The Wizard of Oz' is perhaps the most popular film ever made. Generations of families have enjoyed this classic tale of Dorothy's struggle to return home from a faraway land. What is not well known, however, is that 'The Wonderful Wizard of Oz,' the 1900 book authored by L. Frank Baum (upon which the movie is based), is a thinly veiled economic and political commentary on the debate over 'sound money' at the end of the 1800s in the United States. What in the world could Baum's happy fantasy have to do with monetary policy? This EconomicsMinute examines the historical relationship between the money supply and the price level. This analysis helps us to understand the effects of the current deflation in the Japanese economy as well as the length and severity of the Great Depression in the United States in the 1930s. This lesson points out why it is so important for a central bank to strike a balance between inflationary and deflationary concerns.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 09/09/1999

Related Publications

The following lessons come from the Council for Economic Education's library of publications. Clicking the publication title or image will take you to the Council for Economic Education Store for more detailed information.


Teaching Financial Crises

Teaching Financial Crises is an eight lesson resource that provides an organizing framework in which to contextualize all of the media attention that has been paid to the recent financial crisis, as well as put it in a historical context. The current events stories, opinion pieces, and other popular media pieces that are today in great supply have generally not connected to educational objectives, historical analysis, and economic processes and concepts that are used in the high school classroom. In Teaching Financial Crises, teachers will find a non-partisan and non-ideological resource to help them simplify and offer balanced perspectives on this challenging subject matter.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 2010

3 out of 9 lessons from this publication relate to this EconEdLink lesson.

Focus: Understanding Economics in U.S. History

Focus: Understanding Economics in U.S. History uses a unique mystery-solving approach to teach U.S. economic history to your high school students.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 2006

3 out of 40 lessons from this publication relate to this EconEdLink lesson.

Focus: Understanding Economics in Civics and Government

This publication contains 20 lessons designed to provide an economic insight into topics typically covered in may civics and government classes.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 2009

2 out of 21 lessons from this publication relate to this EconEdLink lesson.