EconEdLink

Related Lessons

Lesson: $16 Billion to Host the Summer Olympic Games: Is it worth it?


The Five Stages of Investing

The practice of saving and investing is definitely a good thing, but there are many ways to save and invest. In thinking about the options, it is important to consider the degree of risk involved and the potential for return. Typically, the higher the risk, the higher the potential return. The key is to work up to the riskier investments, where you stand to earn the most money, but only after you've successfully established some safer holdings. This lesson walks students through the stages of investing, demonstrating why that sort of sequential order is important. At the end of the lesson, students are asked to serve as financial advisors and give advice to people considering investments at different stages of the investment ladder.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 01/30/2008

Satisfaction Please! (Part 1)

Even the savviest consumer has a problem with a good or service on occasion. It is a consumer’s right to complain when there is a genuine problem. In some situations, it is also a consumer’s responsibility. A problem can’t be fixed if no one knows it exists. In this series of three lessons, students learn how to effectively seek redress for a consumer problem. In the first lesson, they are given tips for seeking redress from a seller of a good or service via personal visits, telephone calls an letters. They write a letter in an effort to resolve a consumer problem they or someone they know has experienced. Lessons 2 and 3 focus on what to do when a consumer is unable to get a problem resolved with a seller. A variety of options are presented in both the public and private arena. Students must select sources of outside help that would be appropriate in hypothetical situations they are given.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 11/04/2005

Money and Elections

Students will be introduced to the sources of campaign war chests, learning about the recent court decisions that have allowed for the creation of "Super PACS" and 501 (c) (4) organizations. The exploration will turn to how a candidate raises resources and how spending has accelerated in recent election cycles. Finally, in an activity, the students will be assigned to groups and play the role of campaign strategists in one or the other major party. They will use an array of data, their understanding of the lesson's content, and a map of the United States to determine which states they will identify as safely in their camp, locked up by the opposition, or a battleground state worthy of resource deployment.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 05/09/2016

Related Publications

The following lessons come from the Council for Economic Education's library of publications. Clicking the publication title or image will take you to the Council for Economic Education Store for more detailed information.


Capstone: Exemplary Lessons for High School Economics - Teacher's Guide

This publication contains complete instructions for teaching the lessons in Capstone. When combined with a textbook, Capstone provides activities for a complete high school economics course. 45 exemplary lessons help students learn to apply economic reasoning to a wide range of real-world subjects.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 2003

11 out of 45 lessons from this publication relate to this EconEdLink lesson.

Financial Fitness for Life: 9-12 - Teacher Guide

This publication contains lessons for teaching personal finance concepts to 9-12 students. Lessons for older students illustrate certain uses of more abstract representations.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 2010

8 out of 24 lessons from this publication relate to this EconEdLink lesson.

Mathematics & Economics: Connections for Life - 9-12

Created specifically for high school mathematics teachers, this publication shows how mathematics concepts and knowledge can be used to develop economic and personal financial understandings.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 2001

8 out of 15 lessons from this publication relate to this EconEdLink lesson.