Related Lessons

Interactive Tool: Making Sen$e with Paul Solman: Sounding an alarm on economic dysfunction by practicing sustainable living

The Economics of Income: If You're So Smart, Why Arent You Rich?

The purpose of this lesson is to help you explore the relationship between education and income. Income is earned from one's resources. Those resources might be natural resources (oil field, farm land), capital resources (man-made resources that are used in the production of goods and services: computers, factories, sewing machines), entrepreneurship (the ability to organize the other factors to produce goods or services or labor.) Most people earn their income by selling their labor. The lesson will focus on the following question: "Why do some people earn more income from their labor than others?"

Grades: 9-12
Published: 09/15/2000

Transportation: They Say We Had a Revolution (Part 1)

Advancements in transportation have played a key role in the growth of our nation. U.S.government policies have also had a considerable impact on the development of transport as we know it today. In this series of three lessons,the students examine transportation and its impact on our nation (and vice versa) since the United States declared its independence in 1776. Lesson 1 focuses on improvements in transportation during the 19th century, particularly the development of a national rail system, to show how invention, innovation and infrastructure encouraged western expansion and economic growth. Lesson 2 moves on to the 20thcentury focusing on the development of auto transport and aviation. The impact on communities and world trade, for both good and bad,is examined. Lesson 3 calls upon the students to create a class time line of transportation milestones; the time line will help the students more clearly understand the factors, especially the economic incentives,that have played a key role in what has been called the 'Transportation Revolution.' While these three lessons will ideally be used together as a set, teachers may choose to use one or two of them, selectively, to focus, for example, on the 19th or the 20th century. If you would like your students to study the economics of transportation in more depth, consider following up with the EconEdLink lesson, An Economic Mystery: What Happened to Railroads?

Grades: 9-12
Published: 01/30/2008

The Economics of Income: Which 'Wood' You Choose?

A key turning point in a nation's economic development is when it starts to use its resources for long term versus short term purposes. A natural resource example is trees: should people use wood for cooking food or building homes? Simpler societies tend to use wood predominantly as a fuel source (an output), whereas more advanced economies use wood principally as a capital good (an input) with which to build durable social infrastructure, e.g., houses, furniture, books, boats, signs, etc. The same principle applies to all types of a nation's resources (natural, human, educational, scientific, technological, financial, political, et al.) - sustainable economic growth depends on implementing a long term vision of resources as inputs for producing outputs as efficiently as possible.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 09/15/2000

Related Publications

The following lessons come from the Council for Economic Education's library of publications. Clicking the publication title or image will take you to the Council for Economic Education Store for more detailed information.

Capstone: Exemplary Lessons for High School Economics - Teacher's Guide

This publication contains complete instructions for teaching the lessons in Capstone. When combined with a textbook, Capstone provides activities for a complete high school economics course. 45 exemplary lessons help students learn to apply economic reasoning to a wide range of real-world subjects.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 2003

7 out of 45 lessons from this publication relate to this EconEdLink lesson.

Focus: Understanding Economics in U.S. History

Focus: Understanding Economics in U.S. History uses a unique mystery-solving approach to teach U.S. economic history to your high school students.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 2006

4 out of 40 lessons from this publication relate to this EconEdLink lesson.

World History: Focus on Economics

With lessons combining economics and world history, students discover how people and nations developed as a result of making decisions based on maximizing local resources.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 1996

3 out of 12 lessons from this publication relate to this EconEdLink lesson.