EconEdLink

Related Lessons

Interactive Tool: Making Sen$e with Paul Solman: Sounding an alarm on economic dysfunction by practicing sustainable living


Why does Brett Favre make $8.5 million per year?

What determines a person's salary? Why do professional athletes make so much money? People who work as firefighters, police officers or teachers are clearly more important to our society, yet they make much less money than jocks. What explains this?

Grades: 9-12
Published: 06/06/2006

When Graphs Mislead Us

Students view a video and answer questions about Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Graphs of real GDP per capita are used to demonstrate that the same set of data can be shown in different ways. Students are introduced to the concept of misleading graphs and complete an activity to identify misleading aspects of graphs. Working in groups, students support a given headline statement by manipulating a graph using an interactive tool. This will teach scale, origin, and units on a graph along with what makes a graph misleading. The lesson assumes students are able to calculate rate of change.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 11/25/2014

The Economics of Income: If You're So Smart, Why Arent You Rich?

The purpose of this lesson is to help you explore the relationship between education and income. Income is earned from one's resources. Those resources might be natural resources (oil field, farm land), capital resources (man-made resources that are used in the production of goods and services: computers, factories, sewing machines), entrepreneurship (the ability to organize the other factors to produce goods or services or labor.) Most people earn their income by selling their labor. The lesson will focus on the following question: "Why do some people earn more income from their labor than others?"

Grades: 9-12
Published: 09/15/2000

Related Publications

The following lessons come from the Council for Economic Education's library of publications. Clicking the publication title or image will take you to the Council for Economic Education Store for more detailed information.


Capstone: Exemplary Lessons for High School Economics - Teacher's Guide

This publication contains complete instructions for teaching the lessons in Capstone. When combined with a textbook, Capstone provides activities for a complete high school economics course. 45 exemplary lessons help students learn to apply economic reasoning to a wide range of real-world subjects.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 2003

7 out of 45 lessons from this publication relate to this EconEdLink lesson.

Focus: Understanding Economics in U.S. History

Focus: Understanding Economics in U.S. History uses a unique mystery-solving approach to teach U.S. economic history to your high school students.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 2006

4 out of 40 lessons from this publication relate to this EconEdLink lesson.

World History: Focus on Economics

With lessons combining economics and world history, students discover how people and nations developed as a result of making decisions based on maximizing local resources.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 1996

3 out of 12 lessons from this publication relate to this EconEdLink lesson.