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Interactive Tool: Gen i Revolution - Mission 14: Forecasting the Future


Baseball Economics 201

As many baseball fans can tell you, the New York Yankees usually have a great season record, make the playoffs and make a run towards to the World Championship each year. The Yankees' success--as well as the success of other big market, high revenue teams--has led many to question whether smaller market teams can compete in Major League Baseball (MLB). In fact, in 2009, the Yankees had revenues of $441 million, the most of any team in sports--and more than the revenue of four other MLB teams (Florida, San Diego, Pittsburgh, and Washington) combined! Many baseball writers (who may or may not know very much about economics) have written that our national pastime may be threatened by the big market, high revenue teams like the Yankees (or the New York Mets, Chicago Cubs, Boston Red Sox, etc.) and that smaller market teams (e.g., the Florida Marlins, San Diego Padres or the Pittsburgh Pirates) cannot compete for the high salaried free agents (e.g., Alex Rodriguez, Manny Ramirez) necessary to win championships. In fact, some writers claim that many MLB teams are actually not profitable for the team owners. Are these claims true? Are MLB teams losing money? Are MLB owners looking to dump unprofitable teams on unsuspecting investors? Are MLB players grossly overpaid? This lesson will help your students answer these and other questions.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 05/27/2011

Calculating Simple Interest

How do banks calculate the amount of interest paid on a loan? In this lesson, students will view a Livescribe Pencast to learn how to find the dollar amount in interest that is due at maturity. This lesson uses different time periods such as days, months, and years in the calculation as well as varying interest rates.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 10/20/2011

Lemonade and Cookies

Everyday countries trade their goods because they have the comparative advantage in making that particular good. In this lesson, you will read through an interactive story problem to learn about trade and specialization and the outcomes they have on the world.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 01/09/2003

Related Publications

The following lessons come from the Council for Economic Education's library of publications. Clicking the publication title or image will take you to the Council for Economic Education Store for more detailed information.


Learning, Earning and Investing: High School

This publication contains 23 lessons that introduce high school students to the world of investing--its benefits and risks and the critical role it plays in fostering capital formation and job creation in our free market system.

Grades: 9-12
Published: 2004

23 out of 23 lessons from this publication relate to this EconEdLink lesson.

Trading Around the World

Created as a supplement to existing middle school world geography and world history courses, the 5 units in this guide introduce students to the basics of global trade.

Grades: 6-9
Published: 2007

7 out of 7 lessons from this publication relate to this EconEdLink lesson.